Mindset

“A good traveler has no fixed plan, and is not intent on arriving.”

~ Lao Tzu

While this quote is from a religious source, I think that it can apply to the pursuit of knowledge and education as well. The journey is more important than the destination. The mindset of learning is better than the mindset of knowing.

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3 responses to “Mindset

  1. What good is learning if you are not seeking knowledge? I surely do not want to travel without the destination in view. Then I would be wandering aimlessly, no? Going somewhere, getting nowhere…

    Okay, maybe I would love to get in my RV and travel the North American continent without a particular destination in mind…:mrgreen: But the learning I’d do and the knowledge I’d gain from that journey!

  2. @auntdeedee
    I think that the point is to avoid the mindset that we know everything, because we never will. We can learn and gain knowledge, but we should not hold ourselves high because of it.

  3. “A good traveler has no fixed plan, and is not intent on arriving.”

    It is worth repeating.

    auntdeedee you state:

    “I surely do not want to travel without the destination in view. Then I would be wandering aimlessly, no? Going somewhere, getting nowhere…”

    I am not trying to pick a fight here just looking for clarity. In your scenario you say you don’t want to travel without the destination in view. I will assume (yeah I know) you meant without a destination because in the next line you reveal that you would be wandering aimlessly.

    I like to travel. I think you cannot take the “quote” literally. Of course you have a destination. Let’s say your destination is the Uffizi Gallery in Florence. Your hotel is about a 15 minute walk from the Gallery. If all you care about is the “destination” you will miss the details along the way. You will miss the street vendors, you will miss the smell of fresh baked bread, the ringing of the bells from the many churches, the sounds of the city itself…

    You can still have a destination, I don’t think that the point is to wander aimlessly. I think the destination is not the goal. Learning comes from allowing yourself to include those moments that lead to your destination. Taking the Uffizi as the example, you can come home and pour through a thousand web sites and art history books to “see” the Uffizi but you cannot experience that walk to the Uffizi any other way other than being present and absorbing the details on your journey.

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