Atheists and Vegetarians

I have noticed that a lot of atheists are also vegetarians. This is a question to all of theΒ  atheist vegetarians out there in blog land.

Why are you a vegetarian and how do you think it related to your atheism?

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10 responses to “Atheists and Vegetarians

  1. posting here so links would make sense πŸ™‚

    I’m up for any advice you could give. I’m running out of meal ideas… and I started feeling pretty hungry today, even when I wasn’t. πŸ™‚

  2. The hungry feeling you are having is most likely one of two things. Either you are just thinking you need to eat because you know that you are not eating meat or you are not getting the over abundance of protein that your body is use to.
    We are trained to believe that meat is necessary for good health from childhood. Of course this is not true, but your subconscious mind is unaware of that. πŸ™‚ On the other hand your body is use to huge amounts of protein. In fact protein can be additive. We really only need 5% protein in our diet to be healthy. One thing you could to is eat more beans like lentils… Here is a link…
    http://www.fatfreekitchen.com/nutrition/high-protein-foods.html

    I really don’t know what kind of food you like so I can’t tell you what recipes are good. My taste buds are different from yours. Maybe if you tell me 5 of your favorite foods I could come up with something?

  3. Thanks Zeb. That’s kind of what I figured about the hunger, but wanted to make sure there wasn’t something I was neglecting. I’m not surprised by it. The day before I spent the whole day wondering how long I would have to eat like this before I had any kind of temptation or something to learn from. Then the next day I spend the whole day hungry. πŸ™‚

    As far as foods… I guess just more of the same phenomenon. All day yesterday I would think of something to eat and think… nah I’m tired of that. I ended up making a pretty good black bean chili last night and tonight we had spinach and sun dried tomato penne… which was surprisingly awesome without grilled chicken.

    I actually enjoy all kinds of foods, but always planned around the meat. πŸ˜‰ If you think of anything good tomorrow, let me know. I have to eat a little leftover chili so its not wasted, but I’m up for w/e. If not, I found a chickpea stuffing something or other earlier that’s suppose to make a decent sandwich.

    Thanks again.

  4. You seem to be doing well. Most people have a harder time wrapping their head around how to eat vegetarian style. Good job. All the stuff you have mentioned sounds good.

    I will go over my cook book to see if I can find something good.

  5. OK… Here are three very tasty recipes that we loved.
    The first one is my favorite.

    Greek Salad with Marinated Radishes and Feta Cheese on Grilled Bread

    makes 4 servings

    marinated radishes:
    2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
    1 tablespoon lemon juice
    1 tablespoon minced fresh basil
    1 clove garlic, minced
    sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
    6 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
    1 1/2 cups thinly sliced radishes

    salad:
    12 cups packed tender lettuces, torn
    2 cups halved grape tomatoes
    18 pitted kalamata olives, quartered
    15 fresh mint leaves, torn (optional, but recommended)
    1/2 cup crumbled feta cheese

    8 thick slices country bread, toasted

    For the radishes: Whisk the vinegar, lemon juice, basil, garlic, and
    salt and pepper to taste together in a large bowl. Whisk in the oil
    until the dressing is smooth. Add the radishes and toss to coat.
    Marinate the radishes, turning them occasionally in the dressing,
    while you prepare the other ingredients, about 20 minutes.

    For the salad: Add the lettuce, tomatoes, olives, and mint to the
    bowl with the radishes and toss until the lettuce is coated evenly
    with dressing. Add the feta and toss just until it is evenly
    distributed in the salad.

    To serve, place 2 toasts on each large individual serving plate.
    Divide the salad among the plates, mounding it high on the toasts,
    serve immediately.

    ————————————————————————————-
    ————————————————————————————-
    Creamy Tortilla Soup

    makes 4 servings

    1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
    2 cloves garlic, chopped
    1 1/2 cups tomato salsa, medium or hot, depending on how much spice you like
    4 cups vegetable broth
    2 ripe avocados
    juice of 1 lime
    2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley
    sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
    3 to 4 corn tortillas

    Heat the oil in a large pot over medium heat. Add the garlic and cook
    until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Stir in 1 cup of salsa and the
    broth and simmer for 5 minutes. Remove from heat and allow to cool
    slightly.

    Halve and pit one avocado and place it in a blender of food processor.
    Add the soup mixture and process until smooth.

    Transfer back to the pot, add the lime juice and parsley, and season
    to taste with salt and pepper. Simmer over low heat while you toast
    the tortillas.

    Lightly brush the tortillas with oil and cut them into thin strips,
    about 1/4-inch wide by 2 inches long. Heat a skillet over medium
    heat. Add the tortilla strips and cook until golden brown on both
    sides, about 3 minutes. Just before serving, halve, pit, and dice the
    remaining avocado and stir half of it into the soup.

    To serve, garnish the soup with the remaining diced avocado, remaining
    half cup of salsa, and the tortilla strips.

    ——————————————————————————————
    ——————————————————————————————

    Mediterranean Orzo Salad

    makes 6 servings

    1 1/2 cups orzo
    1 clove garlic, minced
    2 tablespoons white wine vinegar
    1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
    1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
    1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
    1/2 teaspoon sea salt
    freshly ground black pepper
    2 cups (15 ounce can) cooked black beans, drained and rinsed
    1 (6 ounce) jar marinated artichoke hearts, drained and chopped
    2 tablespoons oil-packed sun dried tomatoes, minced
    1/2 cup pitted kalamata olives, sliced
    1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley
    1/4 cup minced scallions

    Cook the orzo in a pot of salted boiling water until tender, about 5
    to 7 minutes. Drain and rinse under cold water.

    While the orzo is cooking, place the minced garlic, vinegar, mustard,
    thyme, oil, salt, and pepper to taste in a food processor. Process
    until well blended. Set the dressing aside.

    In a large bowl, combine the cooked orzo, black beans, artichoke
    hearts, sun dried tomatoes, olives, parsley, and scallions. Pour the
    dressing over the salad, and toss gently to combine. For best flavor,
    allow to sit at room temperature for about 15 to 20 minutes.
    Leftovers are great cold.

  6. Awesome. Thanks for the time. Time to hit the grocery store πŸ˜€

    btw, I’ve had cucumbers marinated that way, but never tried radishes. neat

  7. Bradley ~ How is it going with the “fast”?

  8. It’s going well. I’m starting to enjoy the challenge of coming up with meals. Now, the new hardest thing to deal with is when we’re rushed for some reason or another. It’s not quite as easy to “pick something up” that’s not just a salad. πŸ˜›

    I have noticed that when I get hungry I have a pretty small window of time to eat before I get sick kind of hungry… maybe blood sugar or something.

    I’m learning some decent discipline that I lacked before, without the hassle of a “diet”. I have to be deliberate about what I eat, rather than acting on an impulse. Now if I can just have the grace to translate that to other areas. Sin is kind of weird, like how something as innocent as eating meals to the point of being a vice can have tentacles that effect other aspects of our lives.

    I haven’t exactly worked that out and articulated it yet, but gotta love a fast. πŸ˜€

  9. I had a a problem with iron when I first started. It made my heart race and I felt as if I would pass out. I just took iron supplements for a week or two while my body got use to it. If you are getting sick when you are hungry you could try a hand full of raw shelled sunflower seeds. They are a great energy boost.

    Again, I am sorry I yelled.
    Peace.

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